UC Berkeley: ‘Microaggressions’ are a ‘Public Health’ Issue

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The UC Berkeley School of Public Health ramped up their PC efforts with a town hall meeting discussing an epidemic posing a serious risk to the health of its students and people worldwide: “microaggressions.”

Via National Review:

According to a piece in the Daily Californian by Micha Zheng, soon to be a holder of a master’s in public health, Berkeley “convened a town hall meeting where students, staff, faculty and alumni all gathered to discuss issues concerning racism, white privilege and how the lack of diversity was harming students.” “Many public health undergraduate and graduate students alike brought up their experience with microaggressions, which are a form of unintended discriminatory behavior that still have the same, and sometimes even worse, effect as conscious, intended discrimination,” he writes.

“Many public health undergraduate and graduate students alike brought up their experience with microaggressions, which are a form of unintended discriminatory behavior that still have the same, and sometimes even worse, effect as conscious, intended discrimination,” he writes.

“We needed to act — and act urgently — with respect to the professors who were committing these harmful acts of microaggression toward students,” [Zheng] says.

Add this one to the “Not the Onion” pile. So, we now have people basically calling for a world in which we have to be extremely sensitive about what we say to others, lest we cause serious damage to someone’s emotions. Verbal abuse is one thing. To suggest that we shouldn’t say or do things that imply anything about someone’s gender, race or ethnicity is another thing entirely that creates an environment where people don’t even genuinely communicate with each other for fear of being “offensive.”

But who knows? Maybe pulling out a chair or opening a car door for a woman and asking people about their ethnicities really is a menace to public health. We wouldn’t want to accidentally kill someone, would we?

To make sure you’re not exposing anyone in your proximity to these vicious, high-risk behaviors, watch this PSA by Andrew Klavan, so you can help prevent microaggressions from becoming a full-blown pandemic:

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